Tag Archives: Textus Receptus

Textus Receptus Gospel of John

I completed and uploaded my edition of the Gospel of John containing verse by verse alternation between the Textus Receptus Greek text of John and my English translation.  You can download that there, and also the whole Bible Textus Receptus edtion.  The Greek text I used was Scrivener’s 1894 TR edition.  I don’t see the point of translating Erasmus’ or Stephens’ editions since that would not line up with the King James Version (KJV), with which people are already very familiar.

There are not a great many differences between the Textus Receptus and the Robinson-Pierpont text of John’s gospel, but I noticed that when the TR does differ, it is often following the Western text, i.e., Codex D and Latin. I also noticed a variant reading in the TR for which I know of no Greek manuscript attesting to it (there may be one or two; I have not looked at all MSS.) And that variant is in John 20:29, “Because you have seen me, Thomas, you have believed.” That addition of the word Θωμᾶ, Thomas, is not attested in any of the Greek mss (as far as I know right now.)

Textus Receptus Revelation

I have completed and uploaded editions of the Revelation of John based on the Robinson-Pierpont Greek text, and also another one based on the Textus Receptus.  In addition, my previous eclectic edition of Revelation has added to it many more footnotes.  There are now 508 footnotes in these editions, showing the textual variants, and the ancient witness support for each.
Here you can download the Robinson-Pierpont edition of the Apocalypse of John
or the Textus Receptus edition of the Apocalypse of John

Textual Variant Revelation 11:10

In Revelation 11:10, the Byzantine text says people will “give gifts” to each other, whereas the TR and NA28 says they will “send gifts.”  Which turns out to be the more accurate prediction of gifting in the future?

Revelation 11:10- txt πέμψουσιν ℵ² A C ƒ052 922 1006 1841 2040 2053txt vg it-gig Tyc1,3 Prim Ps-Ambr syriac coptic-bohairic arab TR SBL NA28 {\} πεμπουσιν ℵ* P coptic-sahidic arm2,3,4 Tyc2 Beat πεμψωσιν 2329 π̣[εμψου]σιν 𝔓⁴⁷ ‖ π̣[εμψουσιν] 𝔓¹¹⁵  πεμπειν 2053com  δώσουσιν 046 1828 eth RP hiat 051 2050 2062.  Both Papyrus 47 and Papyrus 115 read words that start with π, so they are some form of the word “send.” To download my document that contains this:  http://bibletranslation.ws/trans/revwgrk.pdf

Revelation 8:7 Homoioteleuton

A case of homoioteleuton in the Textus Receptus

Will one third of the earth be burned up or not?  Revelation 8:7.  This is a variant between Bible versions based on the Textus Receptus, and all others.  The Textus Receptus and the King James Version omit the first of the three phrases below, which means, “and one third of the earth will be burned up.”

καὶ τὸ τρίτον τῆς γῆς κατεκάη
καὶ τὸ τρίτον τῶν δένδρων κατεκάη
καὶ πᾶς χόρτος χλωρὸς κατεκάη

Only three late Greek manuscripts (out of 300+-) omit the first phrase, and it is a clear case of “homoioteleuton” that happened in the Greek copying process.  That means, the lines end the same, so a copyist, having left off his work for a break, then resumed doing his work, and he remembers, “I resume, at the line ending with κατεκάη,” but he resumed with the wrong line ending with κατεκάη.  Skipped one line by accident.  Homoioteleuton.

Or, it could have been a case of “homoioarcton,” that is, all three lines BEGIN the same, with καὶ, and the scribe having left off, resumed, thinking, “I resume with the line beginning with καὶ, but he picked the wrong line beginning with καὶ.

Interestingly, the scribe of manuscript 620 wrote the phrase in question two times, which is another kind of parablepsis from homoioteleuton.

As long as I am on this verse, let’s look at a Bible version.  As you can see, the word κατεκάη is used 3 times, the exact same word and same form of the word, and it means “burned up.”

NLT:  One-third of the earth was set on fire, one-third of the trees were burned, and all the green grass was burned.

So why does the New Living Translation render one of the occurrences of κατεκάη as “set on fire”?  This is simply unacceptable.  Just one of thousands of translation errors in the NLT.  I would never recommend the NLT, or the Message.  If you want a paraphrase, the Philips NT is much better, or the NIV.  I consider the NIV a mild paraphrase.

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Textus Receptus Jude

I have completed and uploaded editions of the Epistle of Jude translated from the Textus Receptus and from the Robinson-Pierpont Byzantine textform.  These, like my eclectic edition, show the readings of 62 Greek manuscripts plus 12 Greek New Testament editions, including the Antoniades, Von Soden, Pickering, Tregelles, SBL, NA28, Wesctott and Hort, Stephens 1550 Textus Receptus, Scrivener 1894 Textus Receptus, Hodges/Farstad, Tommy Wasserman, and David Robert Palmer editions.  These are PDFs in landscape mode.

Download the Textus Receptus Jude

Download the Robinson-Pierpont Jude

You can also download whole Bible editions based on the Textus Receptus and the Robinson-Pierpont.

Textus Receptus New Bible

Announcing a new English Bible translation translated from the Textus Receptus Greek text, into English.

By David Robert Palmer

I recognize and accept, that many of my brethren in the Christian body of Christ believe that the Textus Receptus is the correct Greek text for a New Testament translation from Greek.  Therefore, I have uploaded a new edition of my translation of the Holy Bible that is based on the Textus Receptus.  You can download the Textus Receptus version here, or on my translations page.

The Textus Receptus, also known as the TR for short, is a term used to refer to any of the Greek New Testament editions compiled in the reformation era, by men such as Erasmus, Beza, Elzevir, Stephens, Colinaeus, Aldus, and and later, Scrivener.  The King James Version is the most famous Bible translation made from the Textus Receptus, though all other reformation-era translations were made from it as well.  The King James did not follow the TR in every instance.  Mr. F. H. A. Scrivener made an edition of the TR in 1894 that more closely would resemble the text from which the King James Version was translated.

I have also uploaded TR editions of individual books with the Textus Receptus Greek and English text alternating.  Those are: James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John3 John and Jude.

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1 John Textus Receptus

I have uploaded a new pdf edition of the First Epistle of John according to the Textus Receptus underlying the King James Version of the Bible.  This PDF alternates verse by verse with the Greek text of the Textus Receptus and my new English translation of it.  I have also added its English text to my new edition of the whole Holy Bible, Textus Receptus edition.  This latter will be an ongoing project, slowly changing the text to the TR from the eclectic-text base it had before.  I will also be adding more Greek-English individual book editions like this one of 1 John, based on the TR.

Scrivener – Codex Sinaiticus

Now downloadable, here and on the bottom of my translations page: Scrivener, F.H.A.: A Full Collation of the Codex Sinaiticus with the Received Text of the New Testament, PDF, 8.5 MB

I have had this downloadable for a few years already, but it was only linked to from other peoples’ web sites discussion boards. Now there will be a permanent link on this site.

Codex Sinaiticus

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