Tag Archives: Epistle

Majuscule Epistle of Jude

The Epistle of Jude in Majuscule

I have just created and uploaded the Epistle of Jude in majuscule font, similar to what New Testament manuscripts looked like in the 3rd century.  The Greek New Testament text is the Robinson-Pierpont 2017 text.  Thanks to Alan Bunning for the KoineGreek majuscule font.

If you are particularly interested in the Epistle of Jude, see also my Swanson-style chart of the Epistle of Jude in 62 manuscripts and 12 GNT editions.

Epistle of Jude in majuscule

The Epistle of Jude in majuscule

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Textus Receptus Jude

I have completed and uploaded editions of the Epistle of Jude translated from the Textus Receptus and from the Robinson-Pierpont Byzantine textform.  These, like my eclectic edition, show the readings of 62 Greek manuscripts plus 12 Greek New Testament editions, including the Antoniades, Von Soden, Pickering, Tregelles, SBL, NA28, Wesctott and Hort, Stephens 1550 Textus Receptus, Scrivener 1894 Textus Receptus, Hodges/Farstad, Tommy Wasserman, and David Robert Palmer editions.  These are PDFs in landscape mode.

Download the Textus Receptus Jude

Download the Robinson-Pierpont Jude

You can also download whole Bible editions based on the Textus Receptus and the Robinson-Pierpont.

1 John Textus Receptus

I have uploaded a new pdf edition of the First Epistle of John according to the Textus Receptus underlying the King James Version of the Bible.  This PDF alternates verse by verse with the Greek text of the Textus Receptus and my new English translation of it.  I have also added its English text to my new edition of the whole Holy Bible, Textus Receptus edition.  This latter will be an ongoing project, slowly changing the text to the TR from the eclectic-text base it had before.  I will also be adding more Greek-English individual book editions like this one of 1 John, based on the TR.

2 Peter with Greek text

Announcing a new Greek-English diglot of 2nd Epistle of Peter, with TC footnotes citing 9 Greek editions: TR, Tregelles, Westcott-Hort, Antoniades, VonSoden, Robinson-Pierpont, Byzantine Greek New Testament (f35), SBL, and NA28/ECM2. And citing Greek MSS P72 P74 01 A B C K L P 044 048 049 0142 0156 0209 0247 5 33 307 623 665 1175 1241 1243 1448 1735 1739 1852 2298 2423 2464 2805.

TR edition cited is Stephens 1550, except in 3:7, where Stephens, Beza, Elzevir, Erasmus, and Scrivener are split.

http://bibletranslation.ws/trans/2peterwgrk.pdf

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First Epistle of John Updated

I have updated my pdf of the First Epistle of John.

I have uploaded two pdf files of my translation of the First Epistle of John. This letter, part of the Bible, was written by the Apostle John, and contains a very significant textual variant, called the Johannine Comma. This is found in chapter five, verses 7 and 8.

The updates I made were specifically to the extended critical apparatus for the Comma, adding the complete readings of 4 of the Latin manuscripts, with their English translation, and editing the reading of the Greek Complutensian Polyglot to exactly its accents and breathing marks.

Here is the link to download my translation, the pdf of the one interlinear with the Greek text. Here is the link for the First Epistle of John without the Greek text.

Or to read First John online this link.

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Epistle of James

Translation of the book of James completed.

I have uploaded two pdf files of my translation of the Epistle of James. (See a few excerpts below.) This letter, part of the Bible, was written by the Apostle James, and it almost did not make it into the Bible, into what is called the “canon of scripture.” This is because many thought that its teachings on works contradicted the New Testament’s teachings on grace.

I was surprised how much I enjoyed translating this letter. Many people consider it disjointed, with no discernible outline or organization. I disagree. I like what Shepherd said. He called the letter of James “a series of eight homiletic-didactic discourses” with each discourse developing a principal theme linked together by “skillful use of word-links and thematic recapitulations.” (D. Edmond Hebert quoting Shepherd).

I would venture to say, that those who consider this book of the Bible to be disjointed, possibly have that opinion because of reading a poor translation of it, one which does not translate the Greek transition or segue cues correctly, or whose translators did not understand those cues in the Greek. Not everyone is good at Discourse Analysis.

One theme I noticed in this Epistle is selfishness.
“Vaunting your own selves with your presumptuous words.” Killing, envying, jealousy. epistle-of-james

Excerpts from my new translation of the Letter of James:

“See how a small flame sets ablaze such a large forest. The tongue also is a flame, a world of damage.”

“The fully operating prayer of a righteous person is able to achieve much. ¹⁷Elijah was a human being with emotional weaknesses like we are. And he prayed the prayer for it not to rain, and no rain fell on the land for a period of three years and six months. ¹⁸And he prayed again, and the sky gave rain, and the land sprouted up its fruit.”

⁵Or do you think the scripture says for no reason, “The Spirit whom God made to dwell in us craves possession of us, approaching jealousy”?

Here is the link to download my new translation, the pdf of the one interlinear with the Greek text. Here is the link for the Epistle of James without the Greek text.

Or to read James online this link.

More resources on the General Epistle of James may be found at this link.

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James’ Word Fun

I am having a lot of fun with the Epistle of James. It contains many instances of its author using the same Greek word twice or multiple times. It also contains many instances of intended contrast.

For example, 3 times he uses these words that have the same root:

James 1:8 A double-minded man is ἀκατάστατος – unstable in all his ways
James 3:8 The tongue is a ἀκατάστατον κακόν- volatile menace.
James 3:16 Where there is envy and rivalry, there is ἀκαταστασία– disorder

Read my translation of the Epistle of James.