Category Archives: New Upload

Codex Sinaiticus Correctors

I have in August 2015 adopted the sigla conventions of the NA28 for the correctors of Codex Sinaiticus in Revelation, and updated my apparatus accordingly:

א*           4th century
א¹            4th – 6th century (only one occurrence- in 21:4
א²            7th century
א²a          7th century
א²b          7th century
אc            12th century

To download my translation of Revelation.

Simon the Zealot or Canaanite?

In Mark 3:18 and Matthew 10:4, the the King James Bible has Simon as a Canaanite.  However, in Luke 6:15 and Acts 1:13, the KJV has Simon as a Zealot.  These are not really compatible to be mutually co-existent, since Jesus would not have appointed a Gentile to be one of the Twelve, or one of the names on the twelve foundations of the New Jerusalem in Revelation 21:14.  In teh Matthew passage, in the very next verse, Matt. 10:5, Jesus tells the twelve not to go down any Gentile road, but to go “only to the lost sheep of Israel.”  Jesus surely would not tell a Gentile that.  Moreover, since the KJV admits that Simon was a zealot, this is also unlikely, that a Gentile would be a Zealot, one of the factions of Judaism.  The earliest manuscripts of Matthew and Mark say Simon was a καναναῖος, which word was derived from the Aramaic word for Zealot.  And the Textus Receptus and the Byzantine text have Simon a Κανανίτης.  Strong’s Concordance for this word, G2581, says this word also is derived from קנּא kan-naw’, “Jealous.” Canaan in Greek consistently starts with the letter Χ :

Canaan (ie., Genesis 13:12) Χανααν; Canaanite: Χαναναίων (Genesis 10:18) Χαναναίους (Genesis 15:21)  And in the NT, for the Canaanite woman, Matt 15:22, Χαναναία

BDAG Lexicon: “Κανανίτης, ου, ὁ man from Cana, Cananite. Acc. to Strabo 14, 5, 14 one of the two Stoics named Athenodorus received this name to distinguish him fr. the other Ath.; ἀπὸ κώμης τινός (Cana near Tarsus) was added. Numerous mss. replace the apparently unintelligible Καναναῖος with this term.” Under Κανά it says the home of, “according to many, also of Simon, Mt 10:4 (s. Καναναῖος). – Heinz Noetzel, Christus und Dionysus ’60. – EDNT.BBHW II 926. M-M.”

The bottom line is that both variants apparently mean the same thing: someone from Cana.  The KJV saying Canaanite is simply rendered incorrectly in English.

I have updated my footnotes on the pertinent passages in Matthew and Mark.  They are linked for downloading.

Robinson-Pierpont PDF updated

Due to feedback from the downloading public, I have scrapped the pdf I was offering of the Robinson-Pierpont Greek New Testament, and re-compiled a pdf from a Unicode text document which I obtained directly from Dr. Maurice Robinson.  You can download that here.  Note: there will be a table on contents in a column to the left in the pdf, in which you can click on the book names to go directly to that like an Internet link.  However, if you are viewing the document in your browser, the table will not show up.  You have to right-click the link, choose “save as,” and download it to your hard drive.  Then, after that, when you open the document, the links will show up.

2 Peter with Greek text

Announcing a new Greek-English diglot of 2nd Epistle of Peter, with TC footnotes citing 9 Greek editions: TR, Tregelles, Westcott-Hort, Antoniades, VonSoden, Robinson-Pierpont, Byzantine Greek New Testament (f35), SBL, and NA28/ECM2. And citing Greek MSS P72 P74 01 A B C K L P 044 048 049 0142 0156 0209 0247 5 33 307 623 665 1175 1241 1243 1448 1735 1739 1852 2298 2423 2464 2805.

TR edition cited is Stephens 1550, except in 3:7, where Stephens, Beza, Elzevir, Erasmus, and Scrivener are split.

http://bibletranslation.ws/trans/2peterwgrk.pdf

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Nicene Creed

I have edited and uploaded the Nicene Creed.  This version is as framed in the year 325, according to the text contained in Socrates’ Ecclesiastical History,[1] and I made footnotes where it is different in the texts from the Acts of the Council of Chalcedon,[2] and St. Athanasius.[3] An expanded version later came out of Constantinople, but this is the original Nicene Creed.  The later version also eliminated the Anathema found at the end of the original.

This document of the Nicene Creed is a pdf, and alternates between the Greek text and the English translation.

[1] Soc. i. 8.

[2] In the second and fifth sessions of the Council of Chalcedon, Mansi, Concil. vi. 956; vii. 112.

[3] ad Jovian. 3.

Life Among the Piutes, Sarah Winnemucca

Sarah_Winnemucca_Life_Among_the_Piutes

Sarah Winnemucca

“When I think of my past life, and the bitter trials I have endured, I can scarcely believe I live, and yet I do; and, with the help of Him who notes the sparrow’s fall, I mean to fight for my down-trodden race while life lasts.” –Sarah Winnemucca, in her book “Life Among the Piutes.”

Sarah Winnemucca became famous as a lecturer, on the topic of her people’s plight, as she had some clever things to say. For example, she noted that the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor said “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me…” So she said perhaps she ought to conduct her people out to San Francisco, put them on ships, and sail them around to bring them in through New York harbor, and maybe perhaps then America would treat her people like the statue promised.

I highly recommend this book. It has some very interesting opinions about the Donner Party, among other things.  Some people dispute the recollections of Sarah Winnemucca, but were they present there, like she was?

I have formatted Sarah Winnemucca’s book in PDF, and you can download it here or on my downloads page.