Dependence

Ephesians 4:28 Let him that stole steal no more: but rather let him labor, working with his hands the thing which is good, that he may have to give to him that needs it.

1 Thessalonians 4:11,12 “Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life, to mind your own business and to work with your hands, just as we told you, so that your daily life may win the respect of outsiders and so that you will not be dependent on anybody.”

Notice two things from the above verses: 1, NOT working with your own hands when you are cabable, but instead living in dependence on someone else or on government aid, is not respectable.  2,  it is very close to stealing.

Submitting in the NRSV

I get a kick out of how the New Revised Standard Version weakens every instance of the Greek word HUPOTASSW, seemingly just so that wives are not commanded to submit to their husbands.  Here are 3 instances of the Greek verb HUPOTASSW in 1 Peter in the NRSV:

In 1 Peter 2:13, the NRSV says “accept the authority of” the emperor.  I guess we can accept the emperor’s authority without obeying him or submitting to him?  Cool.

In 1 Peter 2:18, slaves are to “accept the authority” of their masters.  I don’t think it would go over well if the slave did not actually obey his master, submit to his master, whether he “accepted the authority” or not.  The master says, “Slave, go chop a cord of wood.”  Slave says, “Master, I accept your authority over me, but I think I will play dominoes right now.”

Then we have 1 Peter 3:1, where the NRSV says “wives, accept the authority of your husbands.”  No, it says “wives, submit to your husbands.”  That is really quite different.  Peter goes on to say in verse 6 of 1 Peter chapter 3, that Christian wives are daughters of Sarah, so they should imitate Sarah, who called her husband “lord.”

Yes, that is most certainly “politically incorrect.”  But our Lord was arrested for being politically incorrect, and so were his apostles.  Just because the world is rebellious against God’s ways, and worldly wives are rebellious, does not matter.  We, as God’s people, do not conform to the world.  And we as God’s people should not use biased and corrupted Bible translations like the NRSV.

Human Trafficking

Human Trafficking is a normal, accepted part of Islam.

Every month about 1,000 girls in Pakistan are kidnapped, raped, and made slaves, most of them Christian girls, made slaves in Muslim homes.

Major Islamic Gang Enters The Home Of A Christian Family, Grabs A Young Girl, Points A Pistol On Her Head And Kidnaps Her. They Make Her Into A Slave, She Begs Them To Release Her, And They Tell Her, “Your Family Is Dead To You,” They Then Take A Baton And Beat Her Over The Head

Harvard Entrance Exam 1869

Entrance Exam for Admission to Harvard College from 1869

I have typed up the Harvard Entrance Exam from 1869. Of the 210 candidates who took this test, 185 were admitted. In those days very few young people attended high school, and those who did, intended to go to college, and so they did study such preparatory subjects as Greek and Latin.

Harvard Entrance Exam 1869

Algebra from the 1869 Harvard Admissions Exam

Its headings are: Translate into Latin, Latin Grammar, Greek Grammar, Greek Composition, History and Geography, Arithmetic, Logarithms and Trigonometry, Albebra, and Plane Geometry. Some of the topics are: Gyges, Coriolanus, Ephesus, Scipio, the Manilian Law, Elision, the construction in Object-Clauses after verbs of striving, Xenophon, Gryllus, Leonidas, Pausanias, Lysander, Pharsalia, Philippi, Actium, Athens, Sparta, Pericles, prime numbers, logarithms, Binomial Theorem, Cosines, Secants, radii, polygons. Here is a link where you can download the PDF of the Harvard Admissions Exam of 1869 here.

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Eusebius ad Marinum

EUSEBIUS OF CAESAREA, Gospel Problems and Solutions, Quaestiones ad Stephanum et Marinum

Announcing a new upload for you to download. This PDF contains Eusebius’ Quaestiones ad Stephanum et Marinum. Edited by Roger Pearse, Greek and Latin translated by David J. D. Miller.  This document contains the famous passage by Eusebius which indicates that in his day, almost all copies of the Gospel of Mark did not contain 16:9-20.  For that section of the text, right-click Eusebius- Gospel Problems and Solutions, Quaestiones ad Marinum, and choose “save as,” and tell your computer where to save the pdf, then open it and go to page 113 of the pdf, (p. 97 of the printed document.)  There you will find the section entitled “To Marinus.”

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Imagine

John Lennon’s song says, “Imagine there were no heaven above us, no hell below.  And no religion too.”  But, if there were no true religion, then none of us would have any moral basis for telling the Islamic terrorists that what they did in Paris was wrong.  And yes, the terrorists do deserve hell, and they are going to hell.  And why do we tolerate hate?  islam is hate.  Blood.  Murder.  Rape.  Commanded by their founder, by their scriptures, and by their current leaders.  I guess there are too many people guilty of truthophobia.  I’m tired of truthophobes.  What an insane world we live in, where those who call hate hate, are called haters.

John Lennon was a hater, by the way.  He made fun of handicapped people.  Please, no one sing that disgusting song.

Textus Receptus New Bible

Announcing a new English Bible translation translated from the Textus Receptus Greek text, into English.

By David Robert Palmer

I recognize and accept, that many of my brethren in the Christian body of Christ believe that the Textus Receptus is the correct Greek text for a New Testament translation from Greek.  Therefore, I have uploaded a new edition of my translation of the Holy Bible that is based on the Textus Receptus.  You can download the Textus Receptus version here, or on my translations page.

The Textus Receptus, also known as the TR for short, is a term used to refer to any of the Greek New Testament editions compiled in the reformation era, by men such as Erasmus, Beza, Elzevir, Stephens, Colinaeus, Aldus, and and later, Scrivener.  The King James Version is the most famous Bible translation made from the Textus Receptus, though all other reformation-era translations were made from it as well.  The King James did not follow the TR in every instance.  Mr. F. H. A. Scrivener made an edition of the TR in 1894 that more closely would resemble the text from which the King James Version was translated.

I have also uploaded TR editions of individual books with the Greek and English text alternating.  Those are: James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, and 2 John.

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